A blog about a hashtag

 

A fairly prolific tweeter, @PaulGarvey4, uses the following hashtag

 

#NoBestWayOverall

 

Despite several others telling him that there are issues with this, he continues to use it. That is clearly his right. It is clear that 140 characters is not enough to properly explain to Paul why this hashtag is, well, pointless and also potentially harmful.

 

First, “way” is not defined. Does he mean an activity carried out in a classroom? Like a card sort? Probably not. Does he mean a system such as explicit instruction? Closer, I think. Does he mean the set of activities that a teacher we call progressive might use? Sort of.

 

One issue is the lack of definition. Paul uses the hashtag to say that nothing works everywhere and, I guess, any method can work somewhere. The main query is whether or not the hashtag says anything of importance. Does it help us move on? Does it help us improve learning for any group of children? I think it does not.

 

I actually think it is damaging because it allows a teacher who is less confident using a particular technique to claim that there is no best way overall so they do not have to seek a better ‘way’. The issue I have with that is that we should not be simply seeking to justify what we currently do, but we should be looking for improved ‘ways’. The ‘way’ we choose should not be constrained by our current, personal ability to work with children. Teachers are professionals and should seek self improvement. We need to find the best possible ‘way’ rather than be satisfied with the status quo.

 

Also, we should be using evidence outside our own experience as well as considering the constraints imposed by the circumstances in which we work. For example, I am perfectly willing to accept that if one teacher operates in ‘ways’ that are very different from another teacher of the same subject, then that is less likely to be well supported and may not ‘work’ particularly well.

 

But my main problem with #NoBestWayOverAll is what does it say? What it says MUST be true and especially in education where the variables are so numerous. It is like saying “air is air and water is water”. That statement is most certainly true, but what can it possibly add to our knowledge base. So the hashtag has no validity, has no value other than it is

 

too true to be good.

Please. Paul, invent a hashtag that can be defined and has a definition having some value in moving us on. Did you know that ‘water is wet’?

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